Last edited by Gorg
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes found in the catalog.

climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes

Francis W. Murray

climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes

by Francis W. Murray

  • 262 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Rand Corp. in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cooling towers -- Climatic factors.,
  • Snow.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementFrancis W. Murray.
    SeriesA Rand note ; N-1443-DOE
    ContributionsRand Corporation., United States. Dept. of Energy
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 24 p. :
    Number of Pages24
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16442477M

    @article{osti_, title = {Studies on mathematical models for characterizing plume and drift behavior from cooling towers. Volume 2. Mathematical model for single-source (single-tower) cooling tower plume dispersion}, author = {Carhart, R. A. and Policastro, A. J. and Ziemer, S. and Haake, K. and Dunn, W.}, abstractNote = {An improved model for natural-draft cooling tower plumes from. Abstract Formulas for the variation with height of the buoyancy, volume, and water vapor fluxes from large wet cooling towers are derived. The simple formulas developed by Briggs are suggested for.

    And these conditions are becoming more likely in mid-winter because of human-induced climate change. The first blizzard of as viewed from space. NOAA/NASA, CC BY.   The conditional probability (p 12) was evaluated to range from to depending on the seasonal variation and other aspects affecting the level of dependency between the events, as demonstrated in Ref. for strong wind and algae. The probability of the joint event was then obtained by multiplying p 1 with p

    Ryan, W., and Nolan Doesken, An Algorithm to Estimate Traditional Snowfall Measurements from Ultrasonic Snow Depth Sensors at U.S. Observing Sites. Western Snow Conference. 81st Annual Meeting (April , ), pp. Phillips, M., Variability of Snow Sublimation in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Northern Michigan snowfall climatology. Average days of measurable snowfall: Average days of snowfall greater than 2 inches.


Share this book
You might also like
parish register of Sheffield in the County of York.

parish register of Sheffield in the County of York.

Navy Department Real-Estate Projects

Navy Department Real-Estate Projects

Perception and aesthetic value.

Perception and aesthetic value.

Security Trust,

Security Trust,

Buckskin and homespun

Buckskin and homespun

Without a hitch

Without a hitch

The fastness assessment of textile dyestuffs.

The fastness assessment of textile dyestuffs.

Singapore

Singapore

Discovering trees

Discovering trees

Sae Motorcycle Standards Manual

Sae Motorcycle Standards Manual

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

Alphabet Book

Alphabet Book

The literature of the New Testament

The literature of the New Testament

Record Publications. Exchequer Records

Record Publications. Exchequer Records

Our environment strategy.

Our environment strategy.

antitrust treble damage tax proposal

antitrust treble damage tax proposal

autokinetic phenomenon and visual defects

autokinetic phenomenon and visual defects

Culture

Culture

Climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes by Francis W. Murray Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes. [Francis W Murray; Rand Corporation.; United States.

Department of Energy.] -- References:p Previous work has shown that if the temperature in a cooling-tower plume is colder than deg C and the difference between actual and saturation vapor density is less than gram per cubic meter, snow is likely to be produced in the plume even though no natural snow may occur in the vicinity.

The Climatic Probability of Snowfall Induced by Cooling-Tower Plumes Author: Francis W. Murray Subject: This study applies these criteria to all the upper-air soundings from 11 selected stations during the four winter months over an eight-year period to determine probabilities of this type of anomalous snowfall.

Created Date: 9/27/ PM. Interaction between a natural snowfall and a cooling tower plume arc two distinct dynamic plumes (A and B) each one axially aligned on each pair of cooling towers. The vertical plane, Fig. 5b, obtained perpendicularly to the wind at a distance of km downwind from the nuclear plant shows that plume A reaches a height of 1 km whereas Cited by: 3.

The climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes / Francis W. Murray; Misterioso alla valse [music] Destiny waltz [music] Numerical analysis and simulation of an assured crew return vehicle flow field [microform] / K. James We Lectures on Dryden / delivered by A. Verrall ; edited by Margaret De G.

Verrall. was also important. Cooling tower-induced fog at ground-level was never observed in any of the tests, and aerodynamic downwash of the visible plume was absent also.

The cooling towers did cause modification of natural clouds and they occasionally shadowed some local areas from the sun. Merging of the stack and cooling tower plumes was a common. A better understanding of potential climate change impacts on the global hydrological cycle requires knowledge of the interaction between air temperature and water in its various forms.

One important example is the effect of air temperature on snowfall. Previous work has shown that if the temperature in a cooling-tower plume is colder than deg C and the difference between actual and saturation vapor density is less than gram per cubic.

F.W. MurrayThe climatic probability of snowfall induced by cooling-tower plumes Meteorological Effects of Thermal Energy Release (METER) Program, Annual Progress Report, October to SeptemberOak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL/TM, NTIS (), pp.

plumes is those processes designed to dispose of low-grade waste heat by evaporation of water from a hot water source. Cooling ponds, natural draft or atmospheric cooling towers, and induced and forced draft cooling towers are examples of this.

Control or abatement of cooling tower fogs has unique solutions depending upon location. The problem. While the visible plume from a cooling tower is not a pollutant, it can affect the surrounding environment.

Moreover, the accompanied evaporation loss has a great potential for wastewater recovery. In the present study, a novel coupling technology for water conservation and plume abatement was proposed, and its feasibility was verified by using thermodynamic analysis. The Climatic Probability of Snowfall Induced by Cooling-Tower Plumes Simulation of convective cloudiness, rainfall, and associated phenomena caused by industrial heat released directly to the atmosphere Theoretical experiments on cumulus dynamics and glaciation Cooling tower-induced fog at ground-level was never observed in any of the tests, and aerodynamic downwash of the visible plume was absent also.

The cooling towers did cause modification of natural clouds and they occasionally shadowed some local areas from the sun. Merging of the stack and cooling tower plumes was a common occurrence.

• The probability that this is caused by natural climatic processes alone is less than 5%. • World temperatures could rise from anywhere between and °C ( to °F) with a corresponding sea level rise of 18 to 59 centimeters (cm) (7 to 23 inches (in.)) during the 21st century.

The traditional approach of cooling tower plume abatement is supposed to result in an unsaturated, well-mixed plume with a ''top-hat" structure in the radial structure, but this is an idealization.

In induced draft towers the fans are located at the discharge (at the top) and pull the air through the tower as shown in Fig. (A). Air enters the sides of the tower at low velocity through large openings and passes through the fill, whereas the hot humid air is.

A mathematical model is presented that predicts, as a function of distance downwind, the height of the center line of a single visible plume from a wet natural-draft cooling tower in moderate to strong winds.

The analytic method is quasi-Lagrangian; that is, the behavior of a small section or parcel of the plume is analyzed as a function of time. Eight first-order differential equations. Snowfall observations from natural-draft cooling tower plumes.

Kramer ML, Seymour DE, Smith ME, Reeves RW, Frankenberg TT. During the winter ofsnowfall from the plumes of large natural-draft cooling towers of power plants has been observed.

Snow accumulations up to centimeters have been found on the ground at extended distances. Cooling Tower Performance Analysis and Visible Air Plume Abatement in Buildings Situated in Temperate Climate Zone.

Chan Man Him Student Number: A thesis submitted to the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University for the degree of PhD June   Soils reflect the lithological types, and range in thickness from m.

Climate is of Mediterranean type, with cold winters and hot summers. Rainfall occurs mainly from October to December and from February to April. Snow falls every year in the mountains and about every five years in the lowlands (Guzzetti et al., a). For example, the gradual melting of continental snow and ice cover implies that future eruptions are less likely to melt and entrain surface water into the eruption plume, which may affect both the probability of collapse of a plume [Koyaguchi and Woods, ] and the .Reports from several sources, including satellite images, suggest that under appropriate circumstances cooling-tower plumes from large electric power generating facilities can generate nontrivial amounts of snow.

Tabulation of a number of aerial obse.A cooling tower primarily uses latent heat of vaporization (evaporation) to cool process water.

Minor additional cooling is provided by the air because of its temperature increase. Cooling tower selection and performance is based on water flow rate, water inlet temperature, water outlet temperature and ambient wet bulb temperature.

Ambient wet bulb temperature and its.